Posts for: April, 2014

By Craig M. Mize, DDS, PA
April 17, 2014
Category: Oral Health
HowtoImpressSupermodelBarRefaeli

Let's say you happen to be sitting on a plane next to supermodel Bar Refaeli, who was recently voted #1 on Maxim magazine's Hot 100 list. You're a little nervous, but you want to make a good impression. What's the first thing she's going to look at? Your expensive suit? Your sculpted torso? How about — your smile!

“Teeth are the first thing I look at,” explained the glamorous cover girl in a Maxim interview. “A nice smile with beautiful teeth is the most attractive thing.”

We wholeheartedly agree. But, of course, not everyone is lucky enough to be born with a perfect set of teeth. What to do then?

“Let's just say that with today's orthodontists, I don't understand why people wouldn't fix them,” Refaeli stated. Need we say more?

The Israeli supermodel, who has appeared in several Sports Illustrated swimsuit issues, knows what she's talking about. Refaeli started modeling as a young child, but had to put her career on hold for a few years while she got braces. When they came off, at age 11, she began her steady climb to the top of the modeling business.

Plenty of aspiring actors and models — as well as regular folks — get braces as children. But if you're serious about improving your smile, it's never too late to have orthodontic treatment. For adults, there are many options available in addition to the standard metal appliances.

Colorless ceramic braces offer a less noticeable way to correct misaligned teeth. Made of high-tech materials that resist staining, their translucent appearance blends so well with the look of your natural teeth that it can be hard to tell you're wearing them.

Clear aligners are an alternative to braces that are worn 20-22 hours per day. They consist of a series of precision-made, transparent “trays” that gradually straighten your teeth over a period of time. Best of all, you can remove them for special occasions — like meeting a supermodel.

Which type of orthodontic treatment is best for you? Why not come in for a consultation and find out! Working together, we can evaluate your situation and develop an effective, individualized treatment plan that fits your lifestyle.

If you have questions about orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics For The Older Adult.”


By Craig M. Mize, DDS, PA
April 02, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   bridgework  
WhenCouldBridgeworkBePreferabletoaDentalImplant

When a tooth is lost, it’s important to restore your mouth to its proper function and appearance with a permanent replacement, such as a dental implant or a bridge. Recently, the implant system has received the lion’s share of attention (for some good reasons); however, in certain situations, dental bridgework offers a viable alternative. What would cause one method to be favored over the other?

In general, implants are now considered the gold standard for tooth replacement. They have the highest success rate (over 95 percent), last the longest (quite possibly the rest of your life), and don’t affect the integrity of adjacent teeth. Bridges, by contrast, require the removal of tooth structure from adjacent teeth, which can potentially compromise their health. Yet implants aren’t necessarily ideal for every situation. When might a bridge be preferred?

Some people don’t have the proper quantity or quality of bone in the jaw to support an implant; or, they may have anatomical structures (nerves or sinuses) located where they would interfere with an implant. It is possible in some cases to work around these obstacles with bone grafts, or by placing implants in alternate locations; in other cases, a bridge may be a better option.

While most tolerate the implant process quite well, a few people aren’t good candidates for the surgical procedure required to place an implant. Certain systemic diseases (uncontrolled diabetes, for example), the use of particular medications, or a compromised immune system may make even minor surgery an unacceptable risk. In these cases, a decision may be made after consulting with an individual’s other health care providers. Additionally, a few behaviors or lifestyle issues, like heavy smoking or a teeth-grinding habit, tend to make implants have a less favorable success rate.

There are also a few circumstances that could argue in favor of a bridge — for example, if you already have a need for crowns on the teeth adjacent to the gap, it can make the process of getting bridgework easier and more economical. Financial issues are often an important consideration in planning treatment — but it’s important to remember that while bridges are generally less expensive than implants in the short term, the much longer expected life of implants can make them more cost-effective in the long run.

If you have questions about dental implants or bridgework for tooth replacement, please call our office to arrange a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”